Generation X Deep South

tidbits, fragments, and ephemera 32

tidbits, fragments, and ephemera is a sometimes substantial but not making any promises glimpse at some information and news related to Generation X in the Deep South.


“The time a young Prince Charles attended a Georgia Bulldogs game,” October 1977

The man who is now king was the first member of the British royal family to attend a University of Georgia football game. Quite an accomplishment!

The Crime in South Carolina, 1979 report

Published in 1980 by the National Criminal Justice Reference Service, this report gives data “for murder, rape, robbery, aggravated assault, larceny, and motor vehicle theft. They are broken down, when applicable, by type of weapon used, victim-offender relationship, value of property stolen, week of the month, etc. Victims’ age, race, and sex are noted.” Statistics are organized into tables graphs that provide nuanced information about crimes in the late 1970s. For example, from 1977 to 1979, about one-quarter of all murders happened on a Saturday.

The band Alabama wins Country Music Entertainer of the Year, 1982

Harwood v. Underwood, 1985

Though most GenXers, who were 20 years old or younger in 1985, wouldn’t have paid much attention to a Supreme Court ruling about the disenfranchisement of convicted criminals in Alabama, it mattered to the future of voting rights. Alabama’s 1901 Constitution took away the right to vote from any one convicted of “any . . . crime involving moral turpitude”— felonies and misdemeanors. However, according to this lawsuit, “the misdemeanors encompassed within §182 were intentionally adopted to disenfranchise blacks on account of race, and that their inclusion in §182 has had the intended effect.” Essentially, the suit contended that Alabama’s law was designed to prevent as many black people as possible from voting. The US Supreme Court agreed, and Alabama could no longer prohibit people convicted of a misdemeanor from voting. (Unfortunately, felons are still disallowed from voting in Alabama.)


level:deepsouth is an online anthology about growing up Generation X in the Deep South during the 1970s, ’80s, and ’90s. The anthology is open to submissions of creative nonfiction (essays, memoirs, and reviews), fiction, poetry, and images (photos and flyers), as well as to contributions for the lists.

Generation X Deep South

tidbits, fragments, and ephemera 31

tidbits, fragments, and ephemera is a sometimes substantial but not making any promises glimpse at some information and news related to Generation X in the Deep South.


The Lizard Man of Bishopville, 1988

excerpt: “That first Monday in July 1988, Christopher Davis was a quiet 17-year-old on the high school basketball team telling Easterling a harrowing story. He described how he’d had a flat tire driving home from a night shift at McDonald’s and how, as he put the jack back in his trunk, he saw a 7-foot-tall creature with scaly skin and red eyes run toward him. He told her how it caught up as he sped away and made a thud as it landed on his roof. He described seeing its three-fingered claws on his windshield until finally he swerved enough to throw the thing off.”

Summer music festivals at Lakewood, 1992

Thirty years ago this month, Atlanta’s fairly new Lakewood Amphitheater hosted both the HORDE tour (on August 7) and Lollapalooza (on August 20). The HORDE tour that year featured Blues Traveler, Spin Doctors, Widespread Panic, the Aquarium Rescue Unit, Phish, and Bela Fleck. Lollapalooza’s line up for its second incarnation had Lush, Pearl Jam, Ministry, Soundgarden, Ice Cube, Jesus and Mary Chain, and Red Hot Chili Peppers. Lakewood was opened in July 1989 and has since changed its name several times.

Joey Bowker as Nashville’s Bat Poet, late 1990s

In his 2011 obituaryThe Nashville Scene had this to say: “With the death over the weekend of Joey Bowker — the enigmatic public-access zany known far and wide as The Bat Poet — Nashville loses a one-man resistance movement against all that is slick, soulless and done for the money. Bowker, 59, presided over one of the weirdest spectacles in the history of Nashville TV programming: a fleabag variety show featuring hand puppets, stuffed-animal warfare, wrestling matches, and local celebrity cameos ranging from attorney Bart Durham to country warbler Miss Melba Toast. These were embellished with crude first-generation video effects and supported by plotlines that could only be followed by kids and the deeply, irretrievably stoned.”


level:deepsouth is an online anthology about growing up Generation X in the Deep South during the 1970s, ’80s, and ’90s. The anthology is open to submissions of creative nonfiction (essays, memoirs, and reviews), fiction, poetry, and images (photos and flyers), as well as to contributions for the lists.

Generation X Deep South

tidbits, fragments, and ephemera 28: a few from the ’70s

tidbits, fragments, and ephemera is a usually weekly but not always, sometimes substantial but not making any promises glimpse at some information and news related to Generation X in the Deep South.


Strom Thurmond wants John Lennon deported, 1972

It was fifty years ago this month that South Carolina senator Strom Thurmond – well-known for being a segregationist then a party-switcher – was doing his best to get former Beatles guitarist John Lennon deported. Thurmond didn’t care for Lennon’s politics and wanted him out of the country, because he felt like Lennon could influence people to dislike Richard Nixon.

The Mississippi Code of 1972 establishes minimum ages for marriage 

Boys had to be at least 17, and girls had to be at least 15. However, no one younger than 21 could get married younger without parental consent.

Led Zeppelin in Baton Rouge, 1975

The Lynyrd Skynyrd plane crash, 1977

On October 20, 1977, three members of the band were killed when their small airplane crashed in the woods near Gillsburg, Mississippi. Their plane had left Greenville, South Carolina and was heading for Baton Rouge, Louisiana. Singer Ronnie Van Zant, guitarist Steve Gaines, and backup singer Cassie Gaines all died in the crash.

The Dukes of Hazzard premieres, 1979

It was January 26, 1979 when the first episode of The Dukes of Hazzard aired on CBS. The show, which was set in the fictional Hazzard County, Georgia, ran until 1985.


level:deepsouth is an online anthology about growing up Generation X in the Deep South during the 1970s, ’80s, and ’90s. The anthology is open to submissions of creative nonfiction (essays, memoirs, and reviews) and images (photos and flyers), as well as to contributions for the lists.