tidbits, fragments, and ephemera 5

tidbits, fragments, and ephemera is a usually weekly but not always, sometimes substantial but not making any promises glimpse at some information and news related to Generation X in the Deep South.

Concerts and venues in Alabama, August 1982

August 1982 music Alabama

Murder in Mississippi (1990)

It was more than twenty-five years after murders of Goodman, Chaney, and Schwerner – and two years after the feature film Mississippi Burning – that the made-for-TV movie dramatized the incident for American audiences. Actor Tom Hulce won a Golden Globe for playing Schwerner.

“The blizzard of ’93 covered all 67 Alabama counties with snow” from al.com
and
“Archival images from Georgia’s 1993 blizzard” on YouTube

Growing up in the Deep South, snow is a rare thing. So, in March 1993, we were all blown away when we came outside one morning to find inches of the white stuff all over the ground. What would have been passé in states to the north was the stuff of legend in Alabama and Georgia.


level:deepsouth is an online anthology about growing up Generation X in the Deep South during the 1970s, ’80s, and ’90s. The anthology is open to submissions of creative nonfiction (essays, memoirs, and reviews) and images (photos and flyers), as well as to contributions for the lists.

tidbits, fragments, and ephemera 3

tidbits, fragments, and ephemera is a usually weekly but not always, sometimes substantial but not making any promises glimpse at some information and news related to Generation X in the Deep South.


Alabama’s first Free Thinkers Club, 1996

Twenty five years ago this month, two Pelham High School students started Alabama’s first chapter of this atheist organization, which is chartered by the Freedom from Religion Foundation. The article cited here was written by one of the two students, and he describes being frustrated by the presence of Christian symbols and groups on campus.

Dollywood’s Grand Opening, 1986

Thirty-five years ago this month, in May 1986, country singer Dolly Parton opened her now-famous theme park Dollywood in East Tennessee. According to the article on her website, “The Dollywood opening featured many family attractions including the Flooded Mine, Blazing Fury, the Dollywood Express, Smoky Mountain River Rampage and Fun Country, featuring a family favorite, the Big Log Flume.”

Klansman and Louisiana politician David Duke, 1991

Thirty years ago this month, David Duke was making national headlines for his efforts to give “welfare mothers” an extra $100 per month to go on birth control so they couldn’t have more children. Duke was an bizarre and unfortunate fixture of Southern (and national) politics in the 1980s and ’90s. At this time, he was a state representative who was running for governor.

Creationism in Arkansas and Louisiana, 1981–1982

In searching for information to share, creationism and science education seemed to be on some Southern politician’s minds in the early ’80s. In 1981, both Arkansas and Louisiana passed laws requiring that “equal time” be given to creationism and evolution. Arkansas’s law and Louisiana’s Balanced Treatment Act were both declared unconstitutional by the US Supreme Court the following year. Nature magazine ran an article about this titled “Creationism again an issue in Arkansas,” and more recently, PBS produced a documentary that featured these events called Evolution Revolution. In 1981, GenXers would have been as old as 16 and stood to be affected by those requirements for science education, had the laws been upheld.


level:deepsouth is an online anthology about growing up Generation X in the Deep South during the 1970s, ’80s, and ’90s. The anthology is open to submissions of creative nonfiction (essays, memoirs, and reviews) and images (photos and flyers), as well as to contributions for the lists.

tidbits, fragments, and ephemera 1

tidbits, fragments, and ephemera is a usually weekly but not always, sometimes substantial but not making any promises glimpse at some information and news related to Generation X in the Deep South.


Religion Landscape Study, South Carolina

This Pew Research Center study shows that 78% of adult GenXers in South Carolina are Christians, with the bulk majority (19%) as “unaffiliated.” Every other religion added together makes up the remaining 3%. (No year was clearly available for the study.)

Party Affiliation among Generation X by state

This info from 2014 shows that, among GenXers in Southern states, there was a mix of major-Republican and majority-Democrat states. Apparently, at this time Mississippi was no longer considered a state by the Pew Research Center.

University of Georgia launches a newsletter for Generation X alumni.

excerpted: “From a design standpoint, The Fast Times is reminiscent of the popular zines of the ‘80s, where people made magazines that were small in size and easily distributable. Their creators often gave them away for free to increase the spread of their opinions on music, film and other cultural followings.”

Alabama journalist Tim Lockette publishes two novels.

excerpted: “Lockette’s time as a newspaperman lends authenticity to Tell it True. But the 49-year-old said both books are colored by his personal experiences as a member of Generation X – the demographic group born roughly between 1965 and 1980 who were often criticized in popular culture as “slackers” but later gained a reputation for entrepreneurship while steering clear of political activism.”

Demographic breakdown of the Mississippi legislature

These graphs were compiled and are offered by the Center for Youth Political Participation at New Jersey’s Rutgers University. Among the graphs and charts is the category of generation.

“Generation X can flip the script in their communities,” by Kristi Gustavson, CEO of the Community Foundation of North Louisiana

excerpted: “One thing for certain about Gen X, perhaps as with any other generation, is that we refused to adhere to the constraints put upon us by the generation before us.  We sought to very uniquely define ourselves.  Of course, bucking the system is nothing new and certainly not invented by Gen Xers.  Every generation does this to some degree.  What makes each generation unique is not that we choose not to conform it is how we choose not to conform.”

Blues Old Stand, live

The band, which took its name from a tiny community in Macon County, was a staple of the Montgomery, Alabama music scene in the 1980s and 1990s. The band streamed a live show on Facebook in April 2021.


level:deepsouth is an online anthology about growing up Generation X in the Deep South during the 1970s, ’80s, and ’90s. The anthology is open to submissions of creative nonfiction (essays, memoirs, and reviews) and images (photos and flyers), as well as to contributions for the lists.